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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 80 (some duplicates have been removed)
and choose to favor one religion over another. >> a cases rely on articles 9 and 14 of the convention of human rights to protect rights of the freedom of thought, conscience, and religion. the other three appeals were rejected. and nurse was told that her hospital employers were within their rights to rule that her crucifix necklace was a health and safety risk. >> to be suddenly put in a position between regret had to choose between a professional love with a passion or my faith, i chose my faith. i don't feel that any christian or anyone with any strong religious views should be put in that position. >> in today's largely secular europe, it seems that legislation and religious freedoms are increasingly acting at loggerheads to each other. these four british cases were underscored by a feeling among campaigners that christianity is not being afforded the same degree of protection as afforded to other religions. the senior church of england cleric has urged more tolerant of christian traditions, but secular campaigners have welcomed these rulings. >> it is one thing to have a belief a
human beings. so they look for the devil and look among the deities, a very complex religion. very elaborate, very well structured, and they looked among the deities, and they found be issue, the deity called issue. who's issue? i often refer to issue as the imminent -- [inaudible] of the human condition. why do i call him that? issue is an unpredictable spirit. issue exists to teach humanity, but there's always more than one side to an issue. more than one face to any reality. teaches you beware of appearances. the best laid plans of mice and men, etc., issue is the embodiment of the lesson gained by such things. and when you teach humanity about the folly in -- [inaudible] or being dogmatic about any issue, it tends to do it in a rather painful way, you know, hike a good teacher armed with a cane, symbolic cane for adults who haven't learned the wisdom of looking at both sides of a question. and his places are the crossroads where, of course, which is the place where human beings get confused. which road do you take at a crossroads? issue's so mischievous that in the overall pant
. martin luther king jr. andrew seattle who is with the freedom from religion foundation. mr. stittle, abraham lincoln and dr. king too two amazing american icons you want to take their bibles and remove them from the ceremony. >> i much prefer dr. king's writing on the letter from the birmingham jail where he talks about the white church standing on the sideline mouthing trivialalities and pyes irrelevancy while he does the work of the civil rights movement. >> bill: you must know that dr. king invoked god in almost every speech that he made. >> article 2 section one of the constitution which lays out the oath does not say anything about the word so help me god. it says i will preserve to the best of my ability, preserve, defend and protect the states period. it's kind of ironic that the president is going to amend that in the middle of it. >> bill: do you know why george washington wanted the words god so help me god in? do you know why? >> george washington did not say so help me god. the first recorded instance is 1801. >> bill: if you look at his inaugural address it's peppered w
schools. i bought the line. i still buy the line. c-span: have you stayed with your religion all your life? >> guest: yes, i guess i have. i guess i really have -- or it stayed with me. one or the other. c-span: has it been hard? >> guest: sometimes. sometimes, yes. it's a pretty secular business. moving around the world a lot sometimes gets hard, but i think it's also your strength as well as difficult. c-span: people who are angry at the press write a lot that they don't think many members of the press are very religious. do you find that? >> guest: i don't know. you mean whether they practice a religion? c-span: we get calls here where people suggest they're even anti-religious. >> guest: yes, in a way i think for a lot of them, politics becomes their religion or broadcasting becomes their religion. c-span: conservative. >> guest: conservative, yes. i was a charter member, literally, of young americans for freedom back in the early '60s. actually it was the late '50s because i came to new york in '59. read buckley stuff. thought it was great. liked what he said. it seemed to fit in with
that investigates life inside the controversial religion. that's our all-new "rock center," tonight at 10:00, 9:00 central. i'm brian williams. we sure hope to have you back here tomorrow evening. good night.
and the catcher in the rye and of course there is poetry. i had more than one teacher whose religion was elliott's four quartets. and the learned attitude from yates and from the greek anthology. we wanted to come proud open night and laughing. and i love this epitaph of any change greek sailor. in a greek anthology translation from a wonderful teacher. tomorrow the wind will have fallen. tomorrow i will be safe that harbored. tomorrow i said and death spoken out little word. oh stranger this is the nemesis of the spoken word. fight back with daring tongue i would say tomorrow. we marveled at the ability to imagine what it would feel like to be a billiard all rolling across the pool table. we hungered for lives that had emotional range of shakespeare's sonnets and if we were going to be saved we knew it would be by literature. there was the french historian jules michelet who put it is for me as i tried in my mid-40s to turn biography to life writing. history he said, and you could think that he meant to include fee and fiction, history he said is not narrative. it is not analysis. it is resurre
what religion or non-religion they have. it is a matter of trying to be honest, to make sure people are accountable, answerable, and responsible, especially when it comes to the orphan and the widow and the fatherless and motherless and poor, gay, bisexual, black, brown. let us never forget our precious indigenous brothers and sisters 1492, world war rahman one. i'm going to talk about it if i'm the last person in the country that does. my brothers and sisters, too. brother danny knows what i'm talking about. the [applause] that is a tradition that is open to all of as a matter what color we are. it is the choice is that we may. are we going to be so seduced and tinted dollar-tinted by the money dangled, the status and wealth offered, or are we going to be on our way to the graves. finally getting to our bodies, we say, this person was on fire for something bigger than just the ground and the worms. it was about love, justice for justice is what love looks like in public. there is only justice that generates and is something less than justice, you're going to need the love supreme o
or bothered me about my religion. it was hard for me to give up my citizenship and i am sure in tehran is not easy to do. the man behind me in line with a hungarian who hugged me and citizens it great to be an american? i said don't know. i will tell you later. >> we opened the book with a vivid scene from 1968, you had flown to reno to get a divorce in the days before his divorce. very difficult to get a divorce back then. it had be someone's fault and it was not easy. she came back and was in a bit of a state and drove her car directly into the middle of a riot in downtown d.c.. it was the morning after the night martin luther king was assassinated in a city of people here who note exploded. the 1960s and 1968 was a time of major turmoil in the united states and also a huge time of change in your life because you did something that was difficult, you got a divorce after a very long marriage and it was the time when the women's movement was really beginning to get underway in united states but i was impressed that you were not inspired by the women's movement, it was something else. >
. scattered throughout american history. >> have presidents invoked religion in their addresses, always? >> every president has invoked god or a deity in general, but not very specifically. none has actually mentioned jesus christ, four have invoked christianity. also uneven. >> has religion become more or less important over time in inaugural addresses? >> looking into the subject, i'm surprise s surprised to see the turning point came with fdr. first to have an invocation and benediction, the first to go to church on inauguration day. those things tradition nous are only as old as the 1930s and '40s. of t >> the significance of president obama using you dr. king's bible cannot be downplayed. >> we have seen the tradition with abraham lincoln and martin luther king. you think of dr. king's phrase, the moral arc of the universe is long but it dips toward justice. i think president obama is trying to to be part of that arc. >> thank you very much. good stuff, ed ayers. as i said, could i sit here around talk to you all day. thank you. appreciate it. >> my pleasure. >>> president barack o
of question about what religion he is. this is what makes it so hard for me to watch this. i think today, i am is going to clean out the attic instead of watching the inauguration. host: and that is chris in bedford, virginia. live pictures of the national mall as it fills in. 800,000 people are estimated to be here for president obama's second inaugural. that shot you see now is to give the capital. the white in the front, a friend of the mid-screen, those are seats. i guess those are reserved, so you do not have to get down there too early. the people that you see there are standing. there is a lot of standing going on, a lot of standing areas. people arrive several hours early, get through security, and wait for the events, and then join the parade. in a "usa today" this morning is this map that shows where some of the main areas of the events are taking place. here is the capital. here is the white house. the parade route will go, and here is the reviewing stand right in front of the white house here. there's a the two main places. but the third place that will get a lot of attention, were
that today, to be a follower of the yoruba religion is to earn the death sentence in certain parts of nigeria. christians also earned the death sentence in certain parts of nigeria and christians respond in kind and set upon the muslim community. but the level of intolerance based on ignorance has enriched such -- european papers any time in nigeria find out the church has been burned down, worshipers are machine guns, the mosque has been burned down, bombed out of existence because even within the muslim religion there are different degrees of purity. once i consider the other side not sufficiently pure and therefore deserving censorship, the nigerian situation is more complicated as in other societies. there's never one single issue that needs to this total stabilization of society. >> you can watch this and other programs online at booktv.org. .. >> thank you, amanda. um, okay. i wrote a little something here, and i can get my glasses on and read it -- oh, and i've also got it, wait a minute, it's in the kindle. so let's see if i can read it in the kindle. but it's this little t
launched an interfaith speakers bureau where we take out representatives of the 5 major religions and do the same thing and we model in front of high school and middle school students how the faiths can sit down like we are sitting here today and have conversations about our commonalities but about our differences as well. many of the comments we get from students is, wow, you guys can sit up there and talk because most of the pictures our students see are the ones that have been playing across our screens the last 2 or 3 days. we hope by challenging that we can prevent bullying and harassment we've been seeing here today. >> thank you, amina stacy is manager of communications for the los angeles giants. >> if you think about what our mission is, you probably think our mission is to win the world series every year, which hopefully this year we're on the right track, but actually our mission statement, we just went through an exercise but our mission statement has always been to enrich the community through innovation. and it's very, i am very proud of the fact that the giants have been
not -- this is the supreme law of the land religion is part of me but it's not what i'm going to go to. he is not rick sanatorium he is a religious man. >> jennifer: sure, i get that. you are a performer. i'm curious what you thought about the performance of day, the delivery of this. normally you start a big speech with a couple of jokes. but you don't do that with the inauguration. >> not one president has ever told a joke in their inauguration. they tell jokes at the conventions, campaign trail, state of the union, even debates -- >> jennifer: it's so solemn. >> open a joke with what are all of you people doing my backyard something? [ laughter ] >> but i think president obama is savoring looking back at the crowd, that is human to me. he is a human being like all of us. >> jennifer: so this was also a -- these inaugural speeches some have been very brief, some very been very long. this was was 18 minutes. was it about the right length? >> i think so. jerry nabb the congressman from new york looks like he is falling asleep over and over. >> jennifer: yeah, we have his youngest d
religion. tonight at 10:00, 9:00 central. i'm brian williams. we sure hope to have you back here tomorrow evening. good night.
sectors. they are looking at doing the same thing with religion. investments went up over one year, 2009 until 2010. 8% growth in the last five years, which is more than twice as fast as our economy has been growing and by every indicator, the green energy sector is growing. neil: i don't know a lot infatuation, but i know the frustration. >> i think they have probably realized that the green movement is kind of a boring activism. what they should be covering and don't really want attention to would be something like solynda that they called the phony scandal. they don't want to address that. this is a way for them to say we are shifting around for various reasons. i don't think they wanted to cover the real news which the scan was solynda and then they went under. the whole thing was just a disaster. the other stuff is boring activism and others want to let go. >> okay, it has become mainstream. >> "the new york times" this week is facing something like the numbers on 30 or more layoffs. so put this in a separate category to a broader question under obama. we have come to talk about thi
was a graduate of princeton prewar and during the war. buckley says yale is insufficiently respectful of religion despite its religious heritage and the heritage of most elite academia in america and also they don't present the free enterprise side of economics. they are too keynesian and quasi-socialist. rusher agreed with all of that, but i think the greater affinity with buckley can be seen and buckley and his brother-in-law rent facelle's 1954 book in which they say yeah mccarthy has been a little too rough. he has made some errors in judgment but that causes really, really important and he is being treated unfairly. that is exactly where rusher, that's exactly where russian is in 1954 and 55 and 56. in the years where he turns from generic young republican republicanism to hard movement conservatism. there was a bit of a conservative movement before buckley founded the "national review" in 1955 that it was sort of, it was disorganized. the polite term might be entrepreneurial individualistic. whittaker chambers had another way to describe it. he said it was people popping out like rabbits. y
sense is that regardless of culture, race religion try some commonality. these essential human truth compassion and hope some moral precepts are universal. just go and somebody is another variation he said in the speech that made famous in the 2004 keynote address at the democratic national convention in boston, where he said there's a red states blue states, but the united states. he presented himself as the personification of that notion. his presidency has been a rude awakening in terms of how far you can take that. so he has been dealing with that. the promise and frustrations of that idea ever sense. as i'm sure we'll both be experiencing the telephone calls, for the show. >> host: your book ends in 1989, "barack obama: the story." he said there's another volume coming? >> guest: added y2k committed to 40 years of robert caro, so assertive cat that on the down low, but i had every intention and i've done a lot of reporting that the later years, which influences the book even though they're not in it. and i don't want to do a quickie. i tried a rate for history documents coming o
religion they would have been interested in that. >> right. they are protecting al gore because they are protecting global warming. that's what i think it is. bernie i have to run. the journal news is wrong to print the names of legal gun owners. how about juan williams who defended the newspaper digest that? then a factor exclusive the former marines injustly incarcerated in mexico will tell us his story. i had a massive he. bayer aspirin was the first thing the emts gave me. now, i'm on a bayer aspirin regimen. [ male announcer ] be sure to talk to your doctor before you begin an aspirin regimen. [ woman ] learn from my story. ♪ [ male announcer ] let's take every drop of courage, every ounce of inspiration, every bit of determination, and go where we've never gone before. ♪ introducing the radically new avalon. toyota. let's go places. but for most of us it represents something more. it's the time of year that we have all waited for. when we sit on the edge of our seats for four quarters. it represents players reaching a childhood dream. the biggest stage there is in spor
as well? simply the expression of freedom of religion, implement a curfew, shut down the sale of liquor and drugs. white only close down bars and nightclubs, get people off our ministry to late hours all across america. it might have economic consequences. you have to wonder why the president does not double down in his assault on the constitution taking on not only the second, the first, fourth, 14th. there may be a reason that he has begun with the second amendment. without our rights under the second amendment removing the arrest of our bill of rights would be a lot easier, wouldn't it? lets hope everyone understands the priorities of the last year and the reason they're beginning their efforts to roll back our second amendment's rights. a dark name intolerance. can't any politician make a simple point with of discouraging others? the president's control agenda is a coalition of the eager, ready to do his bidding, that is, to do what he says he does not intend to do it all, that is , take away your guns. the "a-team" is your next. smart phone wars. apple used to be the smartest. sams
of religion or prohibiting the free exercise thereof or abridging the freedom of speech or of the press or the right of the people to assemble and petition the government for redress of grieve venss. amendment two, a well-regulated militia being necessary to the security of the free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed. [ male announcer ] ahh... retirement. sit back, relax, pull out the paper and...what!!?? an article that says a typical family pays $155,000 in "wall street" fees on their 401(k)s? seriously? seriously. you don't believe it? search it, "401k 155k." then go to e-trade. and roll over your old 401(k)s to a new e-trade retirement account. we have every type of retirement account. none of them charge annual fees, and all of them offer low cost investments. why? because we're not your typical wall street firm, that's why. so you keep more of your money. e-trade. less for us. more for you. omnipotent of opportunity. you know how to mix business... with business. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in
. >> their brothers in al qaeda, our brothers in religion. they're here with us overseeing things in the same area we are working and our relationship with them is one of muslim. by what right could be expelled them? as a service to france or america? >> at this hideout in another northern town, tuareg rebels say andaeda are proxy's of mali algeria, utilized for years to isolate tuareg communities and prevent the appearance of a tuareg state. >> the main enemy of the mali government is the tuareg. this is the belief system upon which the malian state is based, that the primary interest -- enemy is the tuareg. since the birth of mali, mali had taken the lead just like the french colonialists and the tuareg as ours has never in fact and part of mali. >> tuareg rebels are scattered, trying to regroup. they don't have the logistics and high-tech care of their rivals or the hundreds of millions in cash that al qaeda has from hostage ransoms. what they have is a seemingly endless supply of young men ready to die for the cause. 50-year-old self-determination struggle of the stars indigenous people. >> that
that religion. >> andrea: they claim it's peaceful. >> bob: very peaceful. >> kimberly: they should have respect for the other face. if they want us to respect them, respect the christian faith as well. >> dana: at the state department men you issue a travel warning to tell americans not to go, do you forfeit as american citizen your protection when you, if you disregard that? >> bob: no. you wouldn't. but we don't have diplomatic relations with him. big trouble. >> kimberly: big problem. pray for him and his family. >> bob: one more thing is up next. ♪ ♪ t rest tends to stay at rest... while a body in motion tends to stay in motion. staying active can actually ease arthritis symptoms. but if you have arthritis, staying active can be difficult. prescription celebrex can help relieve arthritis pain so your body can stay in motion. because just one 200mg celebrex a day can provide 24 hour relief for many with arthritis pain and inflammation. plus, in clinical studies, celebrex is proven to improve daily physical function so moving is easier. celebrex can be taken with or without food. and it's
, insufficiently respectful of religion despite its, you know, religious heritage can the religious heritage of most of elite academia in america. also they don't present the free enterprise side of economics. they're too keynesian, they're quasi-socialist. okay, rusher agreed with all that. but i think the greater affinity with buckley can be seen in buckley and his brother-in-law brent bozell's 1954 book "mccarthy and his enemies" in which they say, yeah, mccarthy's opinion a little too rough, he's made some errors of judgment, but that cause is really, really important, and he's being treated unfairly. that's exactly where rusher, that's exactly where rusher is in 1954-'55, '56 in the years where he turns from generic young republican republicanism to hard movement conservativism. there was a bit of a conservative movement even before buckley founded "national review" in 955, but it was -- 1955, but it was sort of, it was a little disorganized. it was disorganized, it was -- the polite term might be entrepreneurial, individualistic. whitaker chambers had another way of describing it, he s
. why is it important to keep religion in the inauguration? father jonathan weighs in next. first, let's weigh in with martha mccallum. >> good morning to everybody on this inauguration sunday as the president prepares for day one of ceremony. new fox polls show his approval ratings compared to that of the nra. interesting numbers. we will show you those. and president clinton with a warning to democrats where guns are concerned. america's newsroom on a special sunday. we'll see you soon! even ragu users chose prego. prego?! but i've bought ragu for years. [ thinking ] wonder what other questionable choices i've made? i choose date number 2! whooo! [ sigh of relief ] [ male announcer ] choose taste. choose prego. [ sigh of relief ] sometimes life can be well, a little uncomfortable. but when it's hard or hurts to go to the bathroom, there's dulcolax stool softener. dulcolax stool softener doesn't make you go, it just makes it easier to go. dulcolax stool softener. make yourself comfortable. ♪ >>> time for quick headlines. a man accused of leading a family drug ring in the u.s. caught
of religion despite their religious heritage of the academe in america. also they don't prevent. their cause i socialists. rusher agreed with all of that. but, i think a greater affinity with buckley can be seen in buckley and his brother-in-law's 1954 book mccarthy and his enemies she's made some errors in judgment but that cause is really important and he is being treated unfairly. that is exactly where rusher is in 1954, 55, 56. in the years where he turns from generic young republican republican as some to the hard movement conservatism. there was a bit of the conservative movement even before he founded the "national review" in 1955, but it was sort of -- it was disorganized, by the blight termite might be entrepreneurial individualistic. whitaker chambers had another way of describing it. it was like people popping out like rabbits. you never knew where they were coming from or where they were going. we might see a little of this today now and then. rusher is absolutely thrilled to hear that there is going to be a conservative weekly magazine. at the time, it was weakly. so when he hears
it illegal for federal and state governments to discriminate based on color, sex, or religion. dr. king's mission brought him to selma, alabama in 1965. he attempted to lead a march to the state's capitol, but mob and police violence forced them to stop. that day became known as bloody sunday. >> somewhere i read of the freedom of speech. somewhere i read of the freedom of press. somewhere i read that the greatness of america is the right to protest for rights. >> mike: dr. king protested until the day he died by an assassin's bullet in memphis. his voice may have been silenced, but his message lives on 45 years later. joining us now from atlanta is dr. martin luther king, jr.'s niece, my good friend alvita king. >> hello, governor huckabee. it's good to be here and to the audience, hello. >> mike: well, you know, when i hear the words of your uncle, i am deeply, emotionally moved because i remember in my lifetime i've seen this incredible change in our country because of his dream and his willingness to put his life on the line to see it happen. as a member of the family, i want you to
and a woman who hated religion. >> unlike brooklyn, this place is going to be full of whites. this place is literally going to be dollywood. >> that's why i made that joke. >> this place is going to make dollywood look like howard university. this is going to be the whitest place in america. >> john: big albino troupe over there. >> it sounds like an episode of the walking dead. they're going to wait for the zombies to come. they will come. >> so white, swedish people will go there and go oh, they're in the neighborhood. >> the zombies might be the atf. >> john: give me a rule for your perfect society? >> i quite enjoy fish. not in reality. i'm more of a whaling -- i'm going extra white there. >> john: if you had your own culty commune, what would it be? >> first of all restaurants i want good restaurants. obviously they will be all over the place in glenn beck's lalapalooza land. i'm happy glenn beck is getting into the restaurant business because he's beginning to look exactly like guy fieri on diners dive-ins and dives. in my perfect america, it would take place in glenn beck's, in hi
"going clear" the author puts scientology and its status aas a religion under a microscope. wright focuses on scientology's obsession with celebrity through its most famous defector, writer/director paul hagus. he won two oscars for "crash." he left the church after his daughters coming out as lesbian forced him to take a look at scientology, he discovered accounts on websites about children working for hours on end, this from nbc's "rock center." >> it's horrible treatment these kids had, terrible, they're made to work so often and all day long and these terrible conditions. [ bleep ] them for that. yeah, they should be taken down for that. >> reporter: in a statement the church says it diligently followed and continues to follow all child labor laws in every state or country in which it operates. the church says complaints about children being forced to perform chores for long hours are unfounded. haggis says he found himself in trouble with the church when he crossed its biggest celebrity, tom cruise, who had worked for years to recruit director steven spielberg into the church,
in gold and religion. why spices. why were spices so valuable back then? it wasn't just that food was terrible in europe, it was. all the spices, each new exotic spice was thought to have certain properties, they might make you feel a bit more randy. how shall i put this? each of these new spices were the niagara of the day so that is one of the reasons his trade became so valuable. so after the conquest and colonization the settlers made fortunes exporting drugs back to europe and consuming them in this hemisphere as well and buy drugs i mean sugar which many people consider a drug, where we get rum from, definitely a drug, coffee, tobacco, and these aphrodisiac spices. these things became the developmental engine for hemispheric development. vast fortunes were created. think about where we are today, washington d.c. virginia, maryland. these were all drugs. the first time a lot of these drugs are introduced back to europe people looked at them with revulsion. tobacco. a bizarre thing. why would you put fire and smoke in your mouth? coffee was thought to be subversive. it had the
on the continent of africa. sunni he muslim is the state religion practiced by 99% of the population there. algeria borders two countries in turmoil right now. libya to the east. and you have mali to the southwest. algeria received almost $3 million in american aid back in 2012. here is bill with more. >> martha, want to remind viewers about the map behind us now. here is the gasfield that was overtaken by terrorists we have been watching over the past week or so. earlier today the leader of the terrorist organization seas he is willing to negotiate with the government of algeria if, if the french with support by the united states stops its bombing campaign here in neighboring mali. remember the northern part of this country was overtaken by islamists everonica mose over r and they hold control in that country. now, you have the country of libya also where many of the weapons from the gaper regime went down in the area to support the islamists in mali. a government in libya still trying to get off its feet and further to the east with president morrisey and the problems and the country are egypt st
. it was the first time discrimination had ever been used in the distinction between race, religion, etc., discrimination in the fact as opposed to judging the size of eggs or something, being discriminate. and so by giving it a name, by giving it a fame it started -- a name it started to have it own life. the ability of a president to name something, i'm jumping ahead a little bit, but in 1934 franklin d. roosevelt was going to give his annual address to congress and was from day one in this country the president at the beginning of the year would give an address to the nation and to the congress. and roosevelt in 1934 says, oh, i'll give it a name, calls it the state of the union. so a lot of these terms which are sort of created by presidents we think are, um, they are from day one. in fact, they're ones that have been added later. and, again, some of them are just wonderful. i mean, i'll just jump to a couple. zachary taylor created the term "first lady." he applied it to dolly madison. that was the first anyone had ever used that term. he said the first lady of the land. benjamin ha
makes religion into an instrument of hatred like j.b. stoner, there are plenty of those. they are near the top of the list. c-span: here is the book. second in the three volume series by taylor branch. this one is called "pillar of fire america in the king years 1963-1965." thank you. >> guest: thank you, brian. >>> you are watching book tv on c-span2. tonight we are at the national press club in washington, d.c. for their annual authors night and we are pleased to be joined here by robert merry who is the author of "where they stand the american presidents in the eyes of voters and historians." mr. merry, do we tend to like our presidents? >> i think the american people love their presidents. they love the presidency. but when they have a president that has not succeeded to the judge a failure, they vary on sentimentally cast them aside and that is our system to read that is what they were invited to do by the founders and by the constitution. >> do we have a short patience? >> we understand the constitution gave them hiring and firing authority over these guys every four years. so th
. it has park ad great debate here in the u.k. about the role of religion in public life. now, the european court today in strasbourg, france, ruled that nadia's implyers, british airways, policy interfered with her right to practice her religion. she was quote jubilant and very pleased that quote, christian rights had been vindicated. british airways sent her home without pay in 2006 when she refused to remove her cross or put it under her uniform. she lost her case in a british employment tribunal, it ruled it is not the religious duty of christians to wear a cross. but ba ultimately changed the dress code rules and reinstated eweida. she feels they did it under pressure and not a change of heart. her victory does again sit her for -- compensate her for lost pay is a symbolic one. >> i have colleagues who wear hijab and muslim colleagues that don't wear hijab. they have a choice to wear it or don't wear it. everybody has the right and faith and makeup to express their faith in their way. why should i be discriminated against on par with other colleagues? >> reporter: british prime ministe
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 80 (some duplicates have been removed)